Rev’d Up

Rev’d Up

It was a strange and almost surreal experience, standing up in front of the congregation while my Pastor spoke loving, kind, and supportive words about me and the faith journey I am on. It was all part of the process of being ordained through my church and carrying with me the fully certified and recognized authority that comes with the title.

My new faith journey began in June of 2009 when my wife and I attended Relevant Church for the first time. Since then, Lee and I plugged into service ministry, small groups, volunteer efforts, and mission trips. I feel our spirituality has grown exponentially since we discovered: faith is about a relationship and not religion, faith is meant to be done in community, and that through our individual faith in God we are stronger together as a couple.

So as Pastor Paul completed the presentation of the certificate of ordination, I felt Lee’s name deserved to be on that certificate as much as mine. I would not be the man of Christ I am today if not for her guidance, direction, and support. I would not be on the cusp of moving to the Dominican Republic if not for her shared enthusiasm and determination to do God’s work. I may have attended the classes at Trinity College of Florida, but Lee was with me every step of the way.


It is an honor and a blessing to be able to celebrate this milestone in my life, and I owe a world of thanks to everyone who also helped make it possible along the way. I feel I am a reflection of the collective love and support I’ve received from my friends and family, and I hope I will continue to be a positive representative of this loving community in the years to come.

On a completely separate tangent, I sent a photo of me to our Technical Director Jarrett asking him if it could be included in the service. It was a picture from my First Communion, and no, it did not end up as part of the service. Although Jarrett wanted to use the pic, Pastor Paul was not on the same page.

Those in attendance at Relevant may have been deprived of this glorious artistry, but you won’t be. So please, enjoy!

Gil FC


Real Talk

Real Talk

In this process that is transitioning to full-time mission work, things got a lot more real today.

It started this afternoon when Lee and I met with our realtor. Referred by my new boss, our realtor Jeff was very nice and we found him to be confident and personable. After we showed him around the house, we sat down to discuss the details of the house, what additional work needs to be done in order to list it, what the right price point is for the house (given various factors), and the expectations Lee and I should have in terms of timelines and processes.

The experience was informative and eye-opening. On some aspects, Lee and I were right on with what we thought the answer would be, and Jeff’s concurrence was reassuring. On other points, however, Lee and I were way off. So it was a bit of a learning experience, and one we can step through with confidence knowing Jeff has our best interests in mind.

A couple of hours later, we fielded a call from my aforementioned new boss and we discussed the missionary agreement the non-profit put together for us, as well as a possible option for living accommodations in the Dominican Republic. It was a constructive and informative conversation, and one that has brought us one step closer to the reality of becoming full-time missionaries.

After it was all said and done, I took a moment to process it all. Selling the house, moving out, finding an interim solution until we can move to Samaná, and figuring out all the logistics and timelines of actually getting to the D.R. For the first time since we thought about making the move into mission work with Advocates of Love, I felt the weight of this new reality bear down on me. For the first time, I had to take a deep breath and deliberately remind myself to trust God.

It’s not hard to trust God. It’s hard to remember to trust God. And for now, that is what I must do: remember to trust in Him. I know this is a process, and I know I cannot determine all the answers myself. Instead, I will pray for continued patience and wisdom, and I will lean on the words of Proverbs 16:9.

In their hearts humans plan their course,
but the Lord establishes their steps.

– Proverbs 16:9 (NIV)

What’s Up, Doc?

What’s Up, Doc?

In July of 2016, while on a mission trip to the Dominican Republic, I suffered a relatively gruesome foot injury. While walking backward as I carried a mattress that would be used for a bunk bed we were building for a family in the village of Quisqueya, I slipped. As I attempted to plant my other foot, it caught on a large rock and I ended up rolling my entire leg underneath my body as I fell. It’s a miracle nothing broke, but the pain was intense nonetheless.

The initial prognosis by the doctor at our mission facility was ligament tears on the top of my foot. When I returned home, my podiatrist confirmed the diagnosis. He said my injury was a good news-bad news situation. The good news is I suffered no fractures. The bad news is with injuries to ligaments, the recovery time is more than double that of fractures.

My foot in 2016. Honestly, I’ve never felt sexier.

In January of this year, I went in for an MRI on my foot. More than a year and a half after the initial injury, I am still experiencing pain and swelling in my foot, especially on days when I’d be on my feet for long periods of time. I did not know what to expect, but I knew I did not want to eventually move to the D.R. with lingering pains for which I had no explanation.

I met with my doctor today to discuss the results of the MRI. The good news (again) is there is no nerve damage and the ligaments appear to have healed well. What I am experiencing, however, is a result of inflammation of the tissue at the base of my toes (I forget the name of the tissue but it’s something in Latin). This inflammation is a result of the injury I sustained in 2016 and will heal with the passing of time.

The Yay God moment is all of this, however, is twofold. First, Yay God I have access to quality healthcare as well as the means to have an MRI and see my physician. The second is there is no long-term damage to my foot. I was concerned the MRI would show injury to the nerves which could mean they would never truly heal. Rather, I continue to manage the discomfort with Ibuprofen and ice, activities that are now a habit for me since the injury in 2016.

I am relieved my foot is not something I’ll have to worry about once we move, and it’s such a blessing to have this situation resolved.

Now I just need to make sure I watch my step going forward (and backward).


Mental Shuffle

Mental Shuffle

Yesterday I wrote about things I am going to miss once Lee and I move to the Dominican Republic. Tonight’s post is kinda’ the opposite, but not entirely.

To say my music family has changed my life is a dramatic understatement. When you follow the dominoes that have fallen, it’s very clear Lee and I would not be preparing for this move into full-time mission work if not for our music family. We ended up at Relevant Church as a result of being invited by our friend whom we met through our music family. Our introduction to Advocates of Love came as a result of my best friend whom – again – I met through our music family. Being introduced to that community of friends back in 2006 has been life-changing.

Part of this music family experience had been The Rock Boat, a floating music festival that is the best vacation you’ll barely remember. Lee and I have had the pleasure of taking part of seven TRB’s, and each one has been uniquely special. From our first in 2007 to our last in 2015 (we missed a couple of years here and there), thinking back on TRB memories makes my heart smile.

I say “last” one because we sailed on TRB XV a day after returning from our first ever mission trip in January 2015. Even though we had a good time, there was something off about that boat. For Lee and me, it was not the go-for-broke party atmosphere we’d enjoyed on previous cruises. Rather, there was an almost somber undercurrent, a whisper from God telling us TRB XV was our last hurrah.

He was preparing us for our next steps.

So here I am, on the sail away day for TRB XVIII, seeing the Facebook posts from literally hundreds of my friends who set sail for five excellent days of music, sun, fun, and killer hangovers. And it’s interesting how The Boat is no longer a priority in my life. Instead, I am filling my days with process steps I need to complete in order to move to a foreign country and serve God with the work my wife and I do.

Just like with old computers when you’d run a defrag command in order to re-order the hard drive, God performs a spiritual defrag in us according to His will. Things we once thought were important are moved out of the way in order to make more room for Him.

Would I like to be on a music cruise with my friends right now? Of course! Is it where I need to be right now? Not even close. Where I need to be is here, prepping my house so I can sell it, reaching out to other ministry organizations seeking partnership opportunities, and praying everything for which we’re hoping comes to fruition.

So instead of pining away about a ship that has already set sail (literally), I’ll close out with a nostalgic look back at what used to be. Enjoy.


Things I’ll Miss (Part 1)

Things I’ll Miss (Part 1)

As Lee and I prepare to take our next steps into full-time mission work, we’ve had several conversations about what it means to give up everything and act out of obedience to God’s calling. Many of those talks have been deep, tear-producing moments that have helped us grow in our faith. Others have been more tongue-in-cheek banter about some of the conveniences we’re going to miss. This is one of those moments.

If you stop and think about it, the list of things we’ll be leaving behind is really quite long. In all seriousness, that’s part of the obedience process. However – and as an example – today was a busy day with errands involving a visit to the veterinarian and an oil change for the car. As is typical behavior for Lee and me, I decided to pick something up for lunch on the way home (as opposed to fixing lunch once I got there).

In a pinch, we like ordering from Little Greek that is in the shopping center across the street from our housing development. The food is always amazing, the service is fast, and it’s an affordable meal. Lee, who was working from home, placed the order, and I picked it up as I completed my errands.

As we sat and devoured our food, the thought came to me. “We’re not going to have this in the D.R.” It was a somber and melancholy thought, one that quickly led to another conversation about things we’re going to miss once we move. So in the spirit of list-making, I am moving the gyros from Little Greek to number 2 on my list of foods I will miss most, second to the deli subs from Publix. Seriously, I may cry if I think about going a year or years without Publix subs.

But in the end (and in all seriousness), missing out on these items and conveniences is so worth it.


The Process

The Process

Our first day at the children’s home in Samaná was amazing. It was so great to see the kids I’d met last December once again, and also to see how they responded and reacted to Lee. It’s been my experience on previous mission trips to the D.R. that once I start speaking Spanish, natural barriers people tend to put up start coming down. So I was curious as to how the kids at the Advocates of Love home would respond to Lee, a blonde-haired and blue-eyed woman who doesn’t speak an ounce of Spanish.

Needless to say, the loved her. Those kids are so full of joy, they threw themselves at her, wrapping their little arms around her as if they’d known her and loved her all their lives. It was heartwarming and endearing to see the reaction on Lee’s face as she withstood the avalanche of attention and affection from the kids at the home.

Having the kids like you is the easy part, but the real reason we were there was to make sure Pastor Elias and his wife Hellen, both board members of the Dominican NGO that was set up in order to establish the children’s home, deemed us capable and appropriately committed for the role of missionaries to run the children’s home. It was, in essence, an interview so Hellen and Elias could get to know us and understand how we came to be called to this opportunity.

Although having a conversation among four people were only two people are bilingual can be tricky, the overall meeting went very well. We sat in rocking chairs on the porch of Casa Rosa, the new dormitory house for the girls under the care of Advocates of Love, and discussed a wide variety of topics and issues pertaining to the role Lee and I seek to fill. We concluded the two-hour conversation with very positive feelings and increased aspirations of being able to make the transition to full-time mission work as soon as possible.

As with all things, however, there’s a process, and for now the process calls for us to wait. We’ll have to wait until the respective boards (both in the U.S. and the D.R.) can meet, discuss, and decide to select us to be the Directors of the home. As antsy as that makes me, I know that God’s timing is always perfect.

“I hope they let us know soon. I can bearly stand not knowing.”

Travel Day

So excited to be traveling to the Dominican Republic for a site visit to the children’s home in Samaná. God willing, we’ll be able to return from this trip as fully approved and commissioned missionaries for Advocates of Love. But for now, it’s one more flight (Puerto Rico to the D.R.), then 2.5 hour drive to Samaná. The adventure is only beginning.